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about the boeing corporation and a faustian bargain. what is a faustian bargain and how does that involve the boeing corporation? >> guest: well, boeing is, a series of agreements with china. one day it's going to come to regret because the company will be really either at chinese subsidiary or working pretty much for the benefit of china and not a u.s. company. and without the plane exports, the sale of boeing planes, our trade deficit would be massive. envy -- what boeing has done basically is turn over its technology to the chinese, to the extent that they are now producing there very own medium-range. >> the equivalent of a 737. >> guest: the equivalent of a 737 plane. they won't be going any more. at some point in time the chinese will sick and it's very nice and we will keep you around, but we don't need to. and how this could happen really says more about the government's involvement in trade policy. we see no problem. it just -- here is the handwriting on the wall. just look and see what you think about it. >> host: what is a faustian bargain? >> guest: in exchange fo
a great example. the boeing aerial refueling tanker, kc-46a, that, you know, first of all should mention we're still under a continuing resolution, so that program like many other programs where funding was supposed to be ramped up, it's stuck at last year's level. so it's already a billion dollars short in that program. but if you add sequestration on top of that and even if you appropriate, you know, a higher level for the year once they replace the continuing resolution, um, you're still left short. well, we had a contract we signed with boeing and a rate at which we were going to buy those tankers coming off the production line. now you're cutting that tunnelfunding. we can't keep can up our end of the contract. now, it's been reported that boeing bid very competitively to win that contract, and they are losing money on the early phases of it. when we have to go as a nation and renegotiate that contract, do you really think we're in a good position to maintain such a competitive price if or is boeing going to walk out of that negotiation in a better position, perhaps not losing money
need a full-fledged simple nigh. why do they need a boeing 737. why does the pentagon send $65 ,000 on a individual to send them to civilian grad school in why are there more generals now than when the army and marines was larger? why do they have a larger staff? cutting all of those won't save you hundreds of billions, but it just shows you the fat spread throughout the pentagon. i'll say u a couple of things. i agree two-thirds of what you said. and i salute your service at foreign service and brookings. it's good to see you. in the interest of debate that's the fun we have together, always. you mention a long list of potential areas of waste one of the most expensive things you mentioned is something i would support and say the state department should do more is idea of mid career sabbatical. not only do we benefit from it here at brookings. have a half dozen or seven of the mid career officer and intelligence community personnel and coast guard officers who teach us a lot but they go back, we hope, with different idea and new idea. if you look at the history of a lot of leaders
the right and make that deal with you. >> boe presidents bashar al-assad on what to al jazeera. they've been talking for the last 55 minutes. our coverage will continue. that is al-assad being integrated -- and greeted by his supporters in damascus. we will dispense. islamic leader today >>> i think cybersecurity remains the top priority because of its national security implications. we saw the congress failed to reach the site security legislation in 2012 as perhaps many would have predicted. they remain a part because industry is opposed to any sort of cybersecurity standard. >> i think another issue is implementing the incentive options to create more spectrum so the ftc has their sleeves rolled up and people are working on that and some hot-button issues are on the licensed spectrum that the sector is coming up with all the time. >> ned neutrality could be a big time. the d.c. circuit is considering the challenge to the fcc rules, and it is unclear how the court is going to rule the there are indications on similar issues in the past the d.c. circuit has been skeptical of the authority.
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)